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Carnegie Corporation of New York: Reimagining Approaches to Multilateralism and U.S. Foreign Policy Grants

Grant Amount: Between $100,000 and $500,000, up to two years
Deadline: Concept Note Due December 2, 2022
Category: Social Science; Foreign policy,
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Carnegie Corporation of New York has launched a request for proposals for projects addressing one or both of the following themes: reimagining multilateral approaches to global challenges; and connecting domestic concerns with U.S. national security and foreign policy making.

Through a competitive process, a small number of proposals will be selected for one-time grants between $100,000 and $500,000. Projects may run up to 24 months. Grants will be recommended for support at either the June or September meeting of the Corporation’s board of trustees.

The foundation seeks research-based projects with the potential to generate knowledge and insights that inform practical solutions relevant to one or both aforementioned themes. Approaches might include, but are not limited to: illuminating and addressing connections between issues or policies that are usually siloed; applying an existing body of research and lessons learned to a different but relevant challenge; identifying and recommending ways to overcome barriers for governments or international institutions to implement new or improved policies, agreements, etc.; creating new datasets or using existing datasets in new ways; collecting and applying qualitative insights from various types of stakeholders through surveys, focus groups, task forces, etc.; and designing and implementing pilot projects with the potential to scale.

Projects are highly encouraged to: involve collaborations among American and foreign experts if the project is relevant to reimagining multilateralism; involve collaborations among experts on U.S. foreign policy and domestic policy if the project is relevant to connecting domestic concerns with U.S. national security and policy making; include participation by experts from underrepresented communities; and demonstrate leadership by mid-career experts.

Think tanks, university-based centers, and independent nongovernmental organizations are eligible to apply. Different centers/schools at the same university may each submit one concept note. Think tanks may submit one concept note for the entire institution. Applying organizations must be based in the United States but are encouraged, where applicable, to have international partners.

Concept notes are due December 2, 2022, and upon review, a small group of semifinalists will be invited for virtual interviews with Corporation staff. Finalists will be invited to submit a full funding proposal, due March 20, 2023.

Please contact Daniel Hadley if you are interested in applying to this opportunity.

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Charles Koch Foundation: Foreign Policy Research Grants

Grant Amount: Commensurate with project scope
Deadline: Rolling
Category: Social Science; Foreign policy,
Additional Information
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The Charles Koch Foundation partners with social entrepreneurs to remove the barriers that prevent people from reaching their potential and supports research that explores the key issues of society and funding innovations in postsecondary education.

To that end, the foundation welcomes applications for its Foreign Policy Research Grants program, which provides support to scholars and research institutions interested in challenging the current foreign policy approach of the United States, providing alternative visions for U.S. foreign policy, and engaging in research that can bridge the gap between ideas and policy. While the foundation is especially interested in foreign policy research projects from the fields of political science, international relations, history, or economics, proposals from all fields will be considered on their merits.

The foundation is especially interested in work that explores topics and issues related to a grand strategy of restraint; examines the role of values and ethics in the formulation of U.S. foreign policy; addresses the unintended consequences of U.S. military actions abroad and explores the costs and impact of engagements in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Syria, Yemen, and other places where significant counterterrorism efforts have been conducted; considers the impact of U.S. military engagement abroad on American society — for instance, the effect of our foreign policy decisions on civil liberties or the health and welfare of veterans; explores the concept of threat inflation and identifies the problematic nature of theories of credibility and reputation in relation to U.S. foreign policy; analyzes executive–legislative relations in foreign policy, including the constitutional division of war powers; examines the impact of domestic interest groups, businesses, think tanks, and the permanent national security bureaucracy on U.S. foreign policy; explores the growth of the intelligence and national security establishments since 9/11; surveys the costs, risks, and impacts of foreign aid and alliance commitments; studies the costs and benefits of burden-sharing and burden-shifting with current allies; scrutinizes Pentagon spending, force structure, and the strategic demands of U.S. defense policy — including structural incentives for military expenditures; considers the consequences of an increasingly multipolar world, especially as concerns principal geostrategic regions (e.g., Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, and the Western Pacific); and explores how changes in technology (such as anti-access and area deferral, commonly referred to as A2/AD) that impact the offense-defense balance can be leveraged to support a sound approach to grand strategy.

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